Jump to content
Placeholder image for header
School of Medicine

VCU School of Medicine

Welcome to VCU School of Medicine

Gifts at Work

Welcome to Gifts at Work

 

Philanthropic gifts have made a difference for our medical students, faculty and programs as well as the community. Discover how:

 

Fall 2013

View the PDF

Contents

1838 Campaign
scholarships change lives

Eric Chang, Class of 2014 Aesculapian Scholar

Tim O'Connell, M'82
planned giving makes a difference for medical school

Practice of Clinical Medicine

Students in Action
Diaz, Mpasi and more

Practice of Clinical Medicine

Surgeon as Sculptor

Reception for Philadelphia alumni

 

 

Summer 2013

View the PDF

Contents

Virtual Visit
Timeline of McGlothlin Medical Center's Completion

Match Day Residency List
find out where the graduating students are heading

Graduation
coverage of a milestone day

Scholarship Stories
Get to know a half dozen scholarship donors

Photo Galleries

Reunion Weekend

Grand Opening
of the McGlothlin Medical Education Center

Match Day

Graduation

 

.

Fall 2012

View the PDF.

Alumni, Faculty & Friends Make their Mark

Get answers to your questions about the new medical education center, learn more about those who’ve supported the medical school’s campaign and find a link to make your mark.

 

Supporting the School’s Immediate and Long-Term Needs

  • The legacy of the Class of 2005’s Rebecca Clary Harris will live on in a scholarship that her friends and classmates established in her memory.
  • The Class of 1954’s Charles and Edna Hoffman used a Charitable Remainder Unitrust to provide for loved ones for a set period of time and, afterwards, being directed to the medical school. 

 

University Unveils New Seal
The library has prepared a presentation on the different iterations of the university seal has seen over the years.

 

The Class of 2016

  • A photo gallery includes images from the school’s annual White Coat Ceremony.
  • A dozen legacy student were seated with the Class of 2016:

Kristen Ashby, M'16

daughter of Kermit B. Ashby, M'80, is a diagnostic radiologist in Hampton, Va.

William Bruch, M'16

grandson of William M. Bruch, Sr., M'45, H'50, retired pediatrician, Henrico, Va.

Michael Del Do, M'16

son of Shari A. Del Do, M'81, an emergency medicine physician in Fayetteville, N.C.

Jared Donaldson, M'16

son of Stephen L. Donaldson, PhD'83, M'87, an ophthalmologist in Provo, Utah

Charlotte Gatliff, M’16

daughter of David E. Mullins, M’70, a nephrologist in Spartanburg, S.C.

David Goldberg, M'16

son of Marty J. Goldberg, M'78, H'83, a cardiologist in Norfolk, Va.

Phil Griffith, M'16

son of Richard P. Griffith III, M'77, a family practice physician in Middleburg, Va.

Mark Hylton, M'16

grandson of John T. Baggerly, Jr., M’57, H’64, now deceased, a radiation oncologist in Danville, Va.

Leo Laub, M’16

son of Harvey M. Laub, M’81, now deceased, a family practice physician in Crozet, Va.

Kristen Lewis, M’16

daughter of Kerry R. Lewis, M’76, H’79, a family practice physician in Fairfax, Va.

Chris Young, M'16

grandson of Henry Royster, M'48, HS'54, a retired general and vascular surgeon from Richmond, Va.

Katie Waybill, M'16

daughter of Peter N. Waybill, M'85, H'88, an interventional radiologist in Hershey, Pa., and Mary M. Waybill, H'89, a transplant nephrologist is Harrisburg, Pa.


Spring 2012

Photo Galleries

Class of 2012

Alumni Giving Back

More Expanded Story Coverage

Or view the PDF.

 

Inaugural Clarence Holland Lecture

Lecture Carries Alum’s Name, Focuses on Health Care Ethics

Clarence Holland Lectures

The Clarence Holland Lectures was established by an anonymous benefactor to recognize the contributions that Clarence A. Holland, M.D., has made to the wellbeing of Virginians and to the ethics of health care. An alumnus of the Class of 1962, Holland practiced as a family physician for 42 years and served as a state senator for more than a decade.

Dr. Larry Green was the inaugural Holland Lecturer. He is chair-elect of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Family Medicine, founding director of its research policy center and a member of the Institute of Medicine since 1991.

Against a backdrop of D.C. debates on health-care costs, coverage and legislation, the Inaugural Clarence Holland Lecture challenged medical faculty and students to speak up.

In a talk titled "What’s the Right Thing for Doctors to Do, Once They Know?” Larry A. Green, M.D., professor of family medicine at the University of Colorado, reflected on the ethical problems inherent in today’s health care system.

Tony Kuzel, M.D., the Harris-Mayo Chair in Family Practice, welcomed Green to the podium, saying “The things he writes about, talks about are things that matter. They’re important for getting you to think and act. I have been one of those people so affected.”

Holland Lecturer Dr. Larry Green (left) is joined by (from right to left) Family Medicine and Population Health Chair Dr. Tony Kuzel as well as brothers and classmates Clarence A. Holland, M’62, and William E. Holland, M’62. Dr. Bill Holland was on hand to mark the inaugural lecture that bears his brother’s name.

Presenting nearly two dozen “things we know,” Green chronicled the health care system’s shortcomings. He accused America’s system of delivering mediocre results at high prices and charges its watchdogs as preferring it to serve as a powerful economic engine rather than producing health.

Green described the U.S. health care system as ranking among the world’s nations as the sixth largest economy, supporting his point that “It’s not that we don’t have enough money, it’s that we haven’t made up our minds to spend it for a healthy population.” Those excessive health care costs, he argues, are due not just to the aging population, but to duplication, poor design and a lack of will.

Acknowledging that his presentation was just one man’s opinion, Green says he does not necessarily expect his audience to agree with him. But he does hope to provoke discussion.

“What I would agitate and advocate for is for you to speak your minds,” he encouraged his audience. “For physicians to remain silent is wrong.”